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Hundreds of airline workers at JFK, LaGuardia and Newark airports set to walk off their jobs amid labor dispute

Those who might walk off the job if the strike goes through include wheelchair attendants, skycaps, baggage handlers, customer service agents, cabin and terminal cleaners and shuttle drivers, The News has learned.

Roughly 700 airport workers at all three major city travel hubs have voted to call a strike this week — and could walk off the job at anytime, the Daily News has learned.

The workers are contract employees for PrimeFlight Inc, which provides curbside and baggage claim services to airlines such as United, American Airlines and JetBlue at JFK, LaGuardia and Newark airports.

Those who might walk off the job if the strike goes through include wheelchair attendants, skycaps, baggage handlers, customer service agents, cabin and terminal cleaners and shuttle drivers, The News has learned.

The employees voted to go out on strike this week after months of frustration in trying to bargain a new contract with PrimeFlight Inc, which has been reluctant to recognize the workers as part of 32BJ Service Employees International Union.

PrimeFlight Inc has refused to bargain a contract with the workers that service major New York airlines, according to the union 32BJ.

Roughly 8,000 of the 12,000 airport workers in the New York region have voted to join unions over the past several years — and the PrimeFlight Inc. employees are just the latest group to try and collectively bargain for better wages and working conditions after voting to join 32BJ.

But PrimeFlight has refused to bargain a contract with the workers that service major New York airlines, according to 32BJ. Its employees in New York brought charges against PrimeFlight to the National Labor Relations Board, which found that the company had violated the law and was legally obligated to negotiate job standards with JFK workers.

When the employees put together a package about their wages, scheduling, seniority, workloads, health and safety regulations and more, PrimeFlight refused to listen to their offers, the union said. A federal judge had to order PrimeFlight to bargain, but still the company walked out of negotiations, according to 32BJ. Since then, PrimeFlight hasn’t bargained in good faith — setting up the conditions that led workers to vote to go out on strike this week, the union contends.